Care Guide

Keep your plants happy and healthy with these care guides.

Click each item below to expand

Easy to Care Ferns!

These micro ferns are easier to grow in the right environment! Most prefer bright indirect light, water regularly, do not let the soil dry out, and provide higher humidity.

Fern Plumosa

Plumosa ferns also called Asparagus fern have a soft texture with a light, airy display. This fern is easy to grow and it has lush feathery leaves that cascade down. These versatile plants are great in hanging baskets, window boxes, combination pots, or even a small-scale groundcover. Sun to part shade but avoid the harsh afternoon sun. Water regularly, but do not let the soil get soggy.

Button Fern

The Button Fern, also called the round-leafed fern, is a little evergreen fern that is easy to grow. It has soft velvety arching fronds with small dark, round, and larger green leaves shaped like buttons. Button ferns only grow 12-18 inches tall, allowing them to be perfect for small spaces. Their small leaflets become more oval-shaped as the plant grows. Prefers bright indirect light and higher humidity with a  constant temperature. Water less often than traditional ferns and do not let it get soggy. You can put it on a wet pebble tray or mist the leaves to increase the humidity. If the fronds are green and not wilted, then you have created a perfect environment.

Australian Gem Fern

The Australian Gem Fern, aka Birds Nest is a new, robust fern with thick, shiny dark green foliage held on with strong, feathery fronds. You will love how easy this plant is to care for, it does not need the higher humidity traditional ferns require and is sterile, so it does not develop messy spores, making it a perfect little houseplant. The waxy coating on the leaves prevents it from drying out and shedding leaves. This fern makes a great focal point in a hanging basket, or in a container arrangement. Water regularly to maintain evenly moist soil – weekly, or more often.

Black Rabbit Foot Fern

The Black Rabbit Foot fern has white, fuzzy rhizomes that resemble a rabbit’s foot and grow on the soil surface outward from the center of the plant.  This popular plant is originally from Fiji, It has lighter green foliage. They make a nice, short, focal point.  They are clean and do not drop leaves like some ferns. They are excellent in hanging baskets, pots, vivariums, or you can even remove the soil and it can be an epiphyte (air plant) when given enough humidity. The rhizomes or “feet” can be trained to grow in any direction. Put it in bright, indirect light and keep soil well drained and moist with high humidity but allow it to dry out a little between watering.

White Rabbit Foot Fern

The Black Rabbit Foot fern has white, fuzzy rhizomes that resemble a rabbit’s foot and grow on the soil surface outward from the center of the plant.  This popular plant is originally from Fiji, It has darker green foliage. They make a nice, short, focal point.  They are clean and do not drop leaves like some ferns. They are excellent in hanging baskets, pots, vivariums, or you can even remove the soil and it can be an epiphyte (air plant) when given enough humidity. The rhizomes or “feet” can be trained to grow in any direction. Put it in bright, indirect light and keep soil well drained and moist with high humidity but allow it to dry out a little between watering.

 Korean Rock Fern

This attractive fern is easy to care for. It’s shiny dark green fronds look lovely and add texture to your home. It remains compact growing 12 to 15 inches tall. Place the Korean Rock Fern in full to partial shade and moist, well-drained soil.

Brilliance Autumn Fern

It has coppery red leaves that are brighter and more dramatic than others in the species. This brilliant plant has leaves mature to deeply cut, dark green. It is easy to grow, it prefers low light, water regularly to maintain evenly moist soil – weekly, or more often. It prefers a good amount of humidity.

Fragrant Maidenhair Fern

This extremely popular fern has delicate leaves with very small fronds and a lacy appearance. These are hardier than tropical ferns but still require bright indirect light indoors. Water regularly, this fern needs evenly moist soil.

Varigated Break Fern

The Varigated Break fern is also called the table fern because of its ability to adapt to indoor conditions. It has delicate foliage, this unique fern has a fun fountain shape.

Requires bright light, moderate humidity, and cool nights.

Emerald Vase Boston Fern

These elegant ferns are bright green with feathery fronds that form fabulous lightweight leaves that look excellent in combination pots, hanging baskets, floral arrangements, terrariums, or in a pot.

Water regularly to maintain evenly moist soil – weekly, or more often and place in full to part shade.

Fluffy Ruffles Fern

This is a variety of Boston fern that has a nice soft ‘fluffy’ texture on its fronds. It is sometimes called the fern with a perm because of its curly fronds. It prefers evenly moist soil a good amount of humidity and indirect light.

Lemon Button Fern

Lemon buttons fern is the smallest of the ferns. It is also called fishbone fern grows only 12 inches tall. It is compact and has rounded leaflets. This cute fern has tiny golden green button-like leaflets on dark green, arching stems. They are ideal in a hanging basket, in a combination pot, or terrarium planting. Feature in an atrium or shade beds in frost-free areas. When its leaves are crushed you can often smell a lemony scent. It prefers full sun, to filtered sun. Water regularly to maintain consistently moist soil and high humidity.

The Gardians herbs

Just Got your Gardians Herbs? Here’s How to Take Care of Them!

Your herbs have traveled a long way to get to you, and they’re tired and dehydrated! Don’t be alarmed if there is loose dirt in the container or if the plants themselves seem wilted or brown. All they need is some fresh air, water, and sunlight!  

Upon Arrival

As soon as your plants arrive, you should remove them from the packaging, transfer them to a container, and follow enclosed instructions to get them growing! But, if you can’t attend to them immediately, they can be kept in the fridge for up to five days.  

Light Needs

Herbs need around six hours of sunlight per day, so the Gardians are perfect for a sunny kitchen or windowsill! Herbs also thrive when soil is kept slightly moist, so water your herbs regularly but not too much at once.  

Herb Care Guide

Oregano

Oregano is a must-have in a culinary garden! It is easy to grow and pares with many dishes! Keep oregano in a sunny spot so it can get those strong afternoon rays. On a porch or a well-lit windowsill is the perfect place for this herb! Plant them 8-10 inches apart. Don’t overwater oregano! Let the soil completely dry out between waterings.

Rosemary

Rosemary loves the sun! If you live in a warm area (we’re talking Zone 7+) you can grow Rosemary outside. Luckily, Rosemary will also do well in containers so long as it can get full sun. Like Oregano, Rosemary won’t tolerate wet soil, don’t water too often. When you plant Rosemary, give it a lot of room. This herb is notorious for growing quickly, and far!

Basil

Like Rosemary, Basil loves the sun and loves the heat. Basil has many healthy nutrients. It is a delicious, fragrant herb that is especially popular in Italian cooking.

Thyme

Thyme also loves the sun and loves the heat. But, if you live in Zone 10 or higher, watch out to make sure Thyme doesn’t get burned. Thyme is a low grower that likes to be left alone to thrive. Thyme is slow-growing from seed to sprout, so we suggest purchasing small plants!

Trendy and beautiful plants that take your home décor to the next level. Living plants brighten up your home and improve your mood. Houseplants can reduce stress, regulate humidity, and increase positive feelings.

GENERAL HOUSEPLANT CARE GUIDE

There has always been something invigorating about growing real plants. Houseplants have come and gone in popularity over the years but recently everyone has peaked their interests again as we all spend more time inside.

Water Tips

Just like everything else in life MODERATION is the key. That doesn’t mean that a teaspoon of water a day is the right instruction, far from it. It means water the plants well but don’t water them again until the soil dries well and they need it. Did you know that the plant needs as much oxygen and air in the soil to do well?

How Much Light Does My Houseplant Need?

Bright indirect light will serve many houseplants well. Avoid a hot west window in the afternoon. An east window that brings morning sun and afternoon shade will usually be good for many houseplants. Remember the further from the natural light the poorer your houseplant fares.

Houseplant Soil and Nutrient Needs

Soil provides support so that the roots can hold the plant upright and store water for the roots to absorb. Well-drained soil, that dries out relatively quickly is a good soil for your houseplant.
Plants must have food to grow. Plants take up food from their roots. Add plant food on a regular basis when watering. Good water-soluble plant foods are available at the garden center in your favorite stores. Just like with humans, giving plants food can be overdone! Once every couple of weeks usually is sufficient.

What Temperature Do My Houseplants Need?

House temperatures are generally fine, a shaded patio is fantastic for you and your houseplants. No freezing or really temps below 45 for most houseplants.
Enjoy!!

How Often to Water Indoor Plants?

Different plants need different watering schedules. As a rule of thumb, ferns require more water and do well with higher humidity. Succulents tend to do best when you do not water them as often. Succulents can get root rot from overwatering. Many plants are ready to be watered when the top one inch of the potting soil is dry to the touch, but it is important to know how often to water your varieties. Read the care guide or search online to follow the recommendations of your plant variety.

What is the Best Pot for My Indoor Plants?

Select the right pot for the type of plant you have. Succulents do well in ceramic pots or pots with good drainage. Be sure there is a drainage hole for your pot, if there is none, water will not have a way to run out. One trick we love, is to put rocks at the bottom of the pot, or in the saucer below it to hold water. This works well for WaterWick ClickStick, that are included with The Gardians indoor plants. It is a patented blue and white rope watering system, which draws water from a reservoir and provides any plant with the right amount of water. It also helps plants that prefer a higher humidity. Be sure to pick a pot that has drainage holes, allowing excess water drain, especially for plants do not like sitting in water.  Using a quality soil medium that drains well is important.

How To Water Indoor Plants

Water the soil not the foliage. The leaves are mostly used for photosynthesis, and do not require water. You can spray them with water occasionally to clean and get dust off, but you want to water the soil. Use room temperature water to avoid shocking the plants. Some houseplants including African violets, cape primroses and some begonias do not like water collecting where their stems or leaves meet the soil. Instead, water these houseplants from below; sit their pot in a container of water so that the roots draws water up from the bottom.

At Seville Farms our goal is to help make gardening easier so you will be successful!

Pilea Peperomioides

Pilea needs bright sunlight. 

Water once a week and keep in well-draining soil.  

Dieffenbachia Compacta 

Compacta has a high tolerance for shade but it also can thrive in bright light.  

Water Compacta thoroughly and let the soil “approach dryness” in-between watering.  

If taken care of properly, Compacta can grow up to two feet tall.  

Calathea Medallion 

Calathea Medallion needs medium/indirect sunlight and will scorch in direct sunlight!  

Keep the soil moist, water regularly, and trim older, damaged, or unhappy looking leaves to maintain peak health!  

Medallion can reach up to two feet in height when cared for correctly. 

Scindapsus Marble Queen 

Make sure to water regularly and mist frequently; Marble Queen needs to be kept moist!  

It also needs indirect sunlight; it’s perfect for a room with curtained or north-facing windows.  

Syngonium Candy Berry  

Candy Berry is low light tolerant but will grow better and show more color if they are in medium light areas. Direct light will scorch their leaves.  

Pepperomia  

Pepperomia needs medium to bright light. Direct light will burn the leaves. Water once a week. Allow soil to dry before watering. If the leaves look faded, it means it’s getting too much sun. 

Succulents. These Instagram-perfect plants have made the world fall head-over-heels with the Southwestern aesthetic. We have gathered all the basics so even the most novice of gardeners can have a swoon-worthy collection of these little guys.

  • Crassula, the well-known Jade Plant, is Succulents 101. We are certain that you have seen this little guy around, as these plants are virtually impossible to kill. Place them in a spot that can provide full sun as the bright light will help them attain their most vibrant color. During the spring and summer, some provide impressive blooms that will add color to your home.
  • Echeveria is the king of the patio planters. If you are an aspiring container gardener, then we recommend that you start with an Echeveria. Start by hosting one in your home during the winter months and then gradually move them outside for the summer once the weather settles. They thrive in full sun, but summer afternoon can cause stress to their leaves. Both over- and under-watering can produce wilting, shriveling, and dropping leaves. It is best practice to keep an eye on your plants and adjust watering levels as needed.
  • Haworthia is also known as the jewel of the succulent kingdom, as their vibrant green leaves add brightness wherever they are. Bright, indirect sunlight serves as the best environment. They can thrive on minimal affection, requiring only a small amount of water (maximum: ¼ a cup). Before watering, make sure the soil is completely dry. Be aware that these plants are prone to mealy bugs, so inspect your plant every so often. If you find one of these pests, spray the plant with a soapy dishwater mixture for two weeks.
  • Faucaria is also known as the “Tiger Jaws.” And with a nickname like “Tiger Jaws,” how could you go wrong? Faucarias grow mostly in the spring and fall. They require good drainage, but with a little shade, they will do fine even in the harsh Southern heat. Faucarias require watering every few days. When lacking water, the stems start to die.

When planting succulents, you can be as creative as you want.

First, you will want to find the perfect bowl in which to plant them. Make sure that you use a container that has a drainage hole at the bottom. If your favorite bowl doesn’t have one, you can drill holes on the bottom.

Next, you will want to find a potting mix of your choice. There are mixes that are specifically crafted for succulents, but you can also create your own with potting soil and sand. Keep in mind that succulents do not thrive with wet roots. Watering will be a breeze, as succulents require very little.

And finally, it’s no secret that succulents love sun—wherever you chose to “house” your plant, make sure there is plenty of sunshine for growth (ideally six to eight hours of sun daily).

Now that you have all the tools to become a master succulent gardener, we would love to see the results of what you create! Join our community with the hashtag #SevilleSucculents. We look forward to sharing some of your favorites!

We LOVE indoor plants! They brighten your rooms, increase your mood, and purify the air. Living décor is a great way to keep your home fresh and trendy. Watering plants correctly is one of the most important factors to help your plants be successful.

How Often to Water Indoor Plants?

Different plants need different watering schedules. As a rule of thumb, ferns require more water and do well with higher humidity. Succulents tend to do best when you do not water them as often. Succulents can get root rot from overwatering. Many plants are ready to be watered when the top one inch of the potting soil is dry to the touch, but it is important to know how often to water your varieties. Read the care guide or search online to follow the recommendations of your plant variety.

What is the Best Pot for My Indoor Plants?

Select the right pot for the type of plant you have. Succulents do well in ceramic pots or pots with good drainage. Be sure there is a drainage hole for your pot, if there is none, water will not have a way to run out. One trick we love is to put rocks at the bottom of the pot, or in the saucer below it to hold water. This works well for WaterWick ClickStick, which is included with The Gardians indoor plants. It is a patented blue and white rope watering system, which draws water from a reservoir and provides any plant with the right amount of water. It also helps plants that prefer higher humidity. Be sure to pick a pot that has drainage holes, allowing excess water drain, especially for plants that do not like sitting in water.  Using a quality soil medium that drains well is important.

How To Water Indoor Plants

Water the soil, not the foliage. The leaves are mostly used for photosynthesis, and do not require water. You can spray them with water occasionally to clean and get the dust off, but you want to water the soil. Use room temperature water to avoid shocking the plants. Some houseplants including African violets, cape primroses, and some begonias do not like water collecting where their stems or leaves meet the soil. Instead, water these houseplants from below; sit their pot in a container of water so that the roots draw water up from the bottom.